Workplace Conflict

About Hot Buttons and Workplace Conflict

What are hot buttons? Hot Buttons are those irritations and annoyances that can provoke you into conflict.

They are the situations or characteristics in others that aggravate and frustrate you, perhaps to the point where, despite knowing better, you instigate a conflict. Interactions with button pushers can leave you feeling dem...

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FREE Hot Buttons Test - What's your conflict trigger?

Not only is it important to understand how people respond to conflict, it is useful to know what kinds of situations are most likely to create conflicts. This test presents a subset of frequently occurring hot buttons used in the Conflict Dynamics Profile (CDP). It is not meant to be a comprehensive examination of hot buttons but rather a way...

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Slowing Down and Reflecting on Conflict

Conflict can become very chaotic.  Emotions run high, facts are slippery, and communications can stop.  When tensions are running high and things feel like they are spinning out of control, the best thing to do is STOP.  While we might feel compelled to talk louder to make our point, it is exactly in these confusing, upsetting tim...

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Developing a Positive Conflict Culture Criticizing Your Performance in Conflict

  e of the passive destructive behaviors measured by the Conflict Dynamics Profile (CDP) instrument is called Self-Criticizing.  This occurs when one obsesses over something they may have said or done in a conflict.  The CDP measures how frequently a person uses this response to conflict.  A little reflection about how...

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Conflict and Matrix Management

   Matrix management evolved to enable organisations to deal with more complex issues.  While it can be effective at improving information distribution and managing multiple aspects of product distribution, matrix management can also lead to increased conflicts.  Research typically points to several conflict sources in...

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